Category Archives: Press

Band Crush Makes Magic

Band Crush Makes Magic

Thursday, December 8, 2016 | by CITY ARTS STAFF

The True Loves

What a night! Thanks to everyone who came out to the Piranha Shop last Saturday to kick off our new City Arts music series, Band Crush. Industrial Revelation and the True Loves delivered three hours of fun, funky tunes to a sold-out crowd—guesting on one another’s songs in special overlapping sets, covering soul classics and closing out the night together with an inspired rendition of Curtis Mayfield’s “Move On Up,” featuring bassist Evan Flory-Barnes on vocals. (Yes, really!) 

And thank you, too, to Mackie and American Music for providing the excellent sound system, and to Artist Home and the Piranha Shop for partnering with us on this first installment of Band Crush. Keep an eye out for the next one in Spring 2017.

Above, Jimmy James of the True Loves solos as bassist Bryant Moore holds down the groove. Photo by Charlynn Tallman.

Jimmy James (left,) Ivan Galvez (center) and Bryant Moore (right) of the True Loves warm up the crowd. Photo by Charlynn Tallman.

The full combined cast of the the True Loves and Industrial Revelation brought the night into full swing. Pictured here from left to right: Ivan Galvez on percussion, Greg Kramer on trombone, David McGraw on drums, Jimmy James on guitar, Bryant Moore on electric bass, Jason Cressey on trombone, Ahamefule J. Oluo on trumpet, D’Vonne Lewis on drums, Evan Flory-Barnes on bass and Josh Rawlings (obscured by a speaker) on keys. Photo by Charlynn Tallman.

Concertgoers got a triple dose of brass with Greg Kramer and Jason Cressey of the True Loves and Ahamefule J. Oluo of Industrial Revelation. Also in this photo: Evan Flory-Barnes and Josh Rawlings of Industrial Revelation. Photo by Photo by Charlynn Tallman.

Between the combined ensembles and the sold-out audience, space was tight in the Piranha Shop. Pictured here from left to right: Josh Rawlings, Ahamefule J. Oluo, Jimmy James, Ivan Galvez, Bryant Moore and Evan Flory-Barnes. Photo by Monica Martinez.

David McGraw of the True Loves and D’Vonne Lewis of Industrial Revelation seamlessly shared drum duties throughout the night. Photo by Monica Martinez.

Read the entire article here.

Green Monkey Records May 2016 Album of the Month

Green Monkey Records
May 2016 Album of the Month

By Tom Dyer

For our May AotM, I am super pleased to feature Industrial Revelation, with selections from their 2 CD set Liberation & the Kingdom of Nri. In this writer’s opine, these guys are the best band in Seattle. Nurmero Uno. They were my number 2 album for the year in 2015 behind The Sonics and that ain’t small potatoes, no sir. I’ve written about them a couple places before and will include that stuff below, but rest assured these gentlemen can get in a room and make it happen. I really love their recordings but they are a super live band and I tell you go see them. They will be playing at Rhythm and Rye here in Olytown this coming Friday, May 20 and you know I will be there.

Dec 26, 2015 – GMR – TD Top 10 Albums: The closest I’ve come to seeing these guys is finding a couple cases of their last CD “Oak Head” on the sidewalk and making sure they got back to them. I kept a copy (they said ok) and thought it was pretty cool. Have tried to go see them a couple times but since they got The Stranger Genius Award they pack out and I ain’t got in. Which brings us to this very fine album. I got it a few weeks ago and I still don’t completely know what I think of it. But I do know I really like it. These guys are considered jazzbos but I’m not even sure that quite describes it. There are definitely serious chops here but there is a prevailing sense of order that somehow seems different to me. At points it is rather grand – cinematic. It is not particularly avant garde or dissonant (which I tend to favor) though some of that intellect seems to inform this. At points it is super groovin’ like on Grace Love’s guest vocal on “First Dance.” Maybe this is just what jazz has become through the filter of thirty years of hip hop and popular music. I dig it.

Josh-Rawlings-Standing-On-Bench-at-Lofi-Performance

Posted to Facebook Jan 3, 2016. “I went out and saw Industrial Revelation (for the first time) last night at Nuemos. This is a great band, at the height of their powers. The ease and beauty of their interaction is a wonderful thing to behold. It is effortless and highly pleasurable. They are each gifted musicians who have been playing together for ten years and know each other well. They clearly enjoy each other’s company.

I put their new album, Liberation & the Kingdom of Nri, at #2 on my Top Ten of 2015. I had a tricky time defining what they do. If you look at their own description on their bandcamp site, it fits the tricky mold. Their ephemeral nature comes into focus seeing them live. Ahamefule on the trumpet is almost like a rhythm guitar player in a rock band. He holds the basic line for many tunes and shapes it thru tonal and dynamic variation and to a lesser degree melodic variation. This leaves a ton of space for Josh on Fender Rhodes, who is living the wah-wah life. On top of his Rhodes is a stack of guitar pedals that he manipulates by hand. It is rare that that you hear a straight Rhodes sound coming from the stage – rather is a constantly changing wash of melodic time and space. D’Vonne is not a traditional jazz drummer in the sense of carrying time on the ride cymbal, snare is king – at points he just rocks four on the floor. Like his compatriots, his chops are super and he can go from a straight groove to open air accenting without a thought. Evan has monster chops like the rest, but also brings a sense of pure joy to his playing that is simply uplifting. As I watched him play, I thought, at that moment, there was no place more beautiful to be than inside his rapture.

If you can see this band, do. The band I watched last night was as good as any band I have seen in my life and I’ve seen a lot of them. Magnificent!”

Read the entire article here.

Industrial Revelation: Toward an “Everything” Music

Industrial Revelation: Toward an “Everything” Music

Industrial Revelation: Toward an “Everything” Music

Industrial Revelation photo by Daniel Sheehan

By Andrew Luthringer

“When we first started playing, I thought, this is ‘everything music.’”

Industrial Revelation is not a musical entity easily pinned down, but keyboardist Josh Rawlings’ invocation of “everything music” points in the right direction. Rawlings and his bandmates Evan Flory-Barnes (upright bass), D’Vonne Lewis (drums) and Ahamefule J. Oluo (trumpet) joined me on a recent afternoon to ponder the myriad possible ways to define what this singular quartet is all about. Earshot’s John Gilbreath, who has championed the band since they first hit the scene, has a take: “To me, the genius of Industrial Revelation is its inherent ability to obliterate imagined walls between genres and camps of music lovers.”

Spend some time hanging with these creative co-conspirators and it’s easy to see the obvious affection and mutual respect they have for each other. As they crest their 10-year anniversary as a band (with no personnel changes), the members of Industrial Revelation speak about the group as a brotherhood, in almost spiritual terms. Flory-Barnes says of their first jam, “I thought we were just getting together to play and see what happens, but from that first moment, it was a ‘thing’…It just felt natural.”

The band has always functioned intuitively, without musical conflict. This is only possible when a very special chemistry is shared. Oluo explains, “Expressing yourself involves trust, knowing that people are going to be there to understand what you’re trying to express.…Everyone in the band is engaged as a primary partner in the music. That’s the way that every song has worked since we started.”

The band members all keep busy with a slew of sideman gigs, and Oluo also maintains a vibrant career in stand-up comedy and theater, but Industrial Revelation remains a central commitment for all four. Rawlings sums it up: “This music fed my soul and my heart.…We do have to juggle. It isn’t easy, but it is easy to say yes to doing music that we love.”

The spirit is only getting stronger – and to prove the point, the band has just released Liberation & the Kingdom of Nri, a two-CD set covering a dizzying rainbow of styles and moods. In an era dominated by short attention spans and YouTube plays, the notion of a double album is bold, almost a throwback. It’s a challenge issued, both to the artists creating it and to the listener. Industrial Revelation is clearly up to the task.

The “everything” notion pops up again, as Oluo elaborates: “There is a conscious attempt to make it an ‘everything’ album, to embrace that concept.…We’ve amassed knowledge, we’ve amassed material and history. We can present a big picture.”

The picture is wide-angle, and the album’s original compositions, contributed by all members, span genres and eras: anthemic and psychedelic rock flavors, tender piano interludes, string-laden soundtrack vibes and electronic textures, ‘70s vintage soul and fusion, and heartfelt melodies leavened with the timeless spirit of New Orleans. Lewis smiles knowingly, and puts it simply: “It’s a gumbo.”

What’s also notable about the album is that the band is clearly following their hearts, not chasing trends. Oluo says they approached collaboration “in a very non-analytical way. A very thoughtful way, emotionally, but we don’t really get into creating a ‘strategy’ to approaching a song.”

When we spoke, the band was preparing for a West Coast tour, and, for a unit that operates in a spirit of vibe and interaction, it’s no surprise that the live experience is spoken about in modes of transcendence. Rawlings says, “We want everyone to be involved. I don’t get super into the ‘woo,’ but you can’t deny an energy in the room, with the sonic vibration and people pouring love at you.”

Oluo chimes in: “We’re always searching for our own humanity on stage, and when you do that, you’re getting to the core of other people’s humanity.…If you find something real and you get it out, people will feel that.”

For an “everything” band like Industrial Revelation, finding the right venue can be a delicate art. There’s no obvious pipeline or well-worn path through a particular scene, and the band’s spirit of inclusion draws a varied audience.

“There’s not really an infrastructure for us,” says Oluo. “We don’t really fall under the jazz infrastructure, we don’t fall under the indie-rock infrastructure.”

Lewis adds: “People will say, ‘You should play here, this is a big venue.’ But is it a hang? Is it a good vibe?”

This search for the right vibe enables the band to be successful playing gigs in often-unconventional venues, from warehouses to shopping malls. As Oluo points out, “It doesn’t matter where it is, you can have a great show anywhere.”

The band is outward looking, but their commitment to the Seattle scene is palpable, and they pay tribute to the astounding range of Seattle music history. After invoking Jimi Hendrix, Quincy Jones, and Shabazz Palaces, Oluo elaborates, “There’s as much Alice in Chains in what I’m doing as there is Louis Armstrong! … I feel a bond to Seattle music. The grunge era was during my early teenage formative years – I usually wear flannel to this day! [laughs] To know the streets…to know the schools that those people came out of, there’s something special about that.”

Flory-Barnes adds, “All the eras of Seattle music, high points ranging from the Jackson Street days, the early days of jazz, to the Wheedle’s Groove days…that’s all in our music.”

Genre agnosticism aside, Industrial Revelation will no doubt continue to find themselves appointed as ambassadors to run the “jazz” gauntlet. This is a role well-cast: A durable and repeated band story is of fans telling them “they didn’t think they liked jazz, but are now inspired to dig in to other realms of the music.”

Oluo remarks, “We’re on the verge of a really interesting time for jazz. I was afraid of the label ‘jazz’ for a long time, and now I feel like I can embrace it again.”

Rawlings provides a final thought: “I think jazz in a sense is an ‘everything music.’ It’s more of an idea, of freedom of expression.…To be a vehicle to go deeper into any style of music that we really want to.”

Go deep with Industrial Revelation – it’s a trip well worth taking.

Industrial Revelation in 2016

January 2 – Neumos (Capitol Hill, Seattle)
January 23 – The Seasons Performance Hall (Yakima, WA)
January 30 – Timbrrr! Winter Music Festival (Leavenworth, WA)

Read the entire article here.

DJ Logic, Andy Coe, Pete Ciotti, & Wil Blades 11.5.15

Nectar Lounge

Seattle, WA

Words By Coleman Schwartz
Photos By Scott Shrader (J. Scott Shrader Photography)

Thursday night at Nectar Lounge in Seattle saw one of the venue’s most interesting bills in recent memory. Local contemporary jazz quartet Industrial Revelation started things off, and the headlining act was a super-jam between guitarist Andy Coe, drummer Pete Ciotti, organist Will Blades and DJ Logic.

Industrial Revelation brought a large contingent of fans out to catch their set. Nectar took on the vibe of a jazz club, with many patrons watching from the seats and those standing not pushed so tightly together. The band’s set was nothing less than prolific. The four musicians, drummer D’Vonne Lewis, bassist Evan Flory-Barnes, trumpeter Ahamefule Oluo and keyboardist Josh Rawlings, are each among the finest musicians in Seattle at their respective instrument. Within the first track, I was extremely impressed at how well the four of them could play together. They somehow found enough sonic space for all four members to solo simultaneously, while still sounding tasteful and controlled. They walked a fine line between symphony and cacophony; if just one of them had gone a bit overboard the results could have been disastrous at some points. They clearly all place a lot of trust in each other to teeter on this edge, and the gamble pays off big time.

When it came time for the first proper solo of the show, Flory-Barnes drove the crowd mad with his smoothly executed upright bass work. He made the instrument absolutely scream, and was able to use hammer-ons and pull-offs with a proficiency I did not realize was possible on upright. He made brilliant use of his high notes, always adding in the perfect harmonies to his previous lines, but never missing a beat in terms of driving the melody. He passed the spotlight to Rawlings, who wowed us with his refined dynamics and effects usage. As the crowd focused on his keyboard solo, Lewis tip-toed back into the mix behind him, their apparent psychic connection flooring everyone in attendance. As Flory-Barnes locked into a groove with Lewis, Rawlings continued his solo over the top, adding in lots of wah-pedal. Oluo sat this portion out, dancing heartily on the side of the stage. He rejoined the band briefly to close out the song, but you could tell he was due for an explosion later in the show.

The next song was the title track to their new album, Liberation & the Kingdom of Nri, titled “Liberation.” This tune was best described as jazz-influenced space-funk. Flory-Barnes moved the song along with his melodic bass work, occupying the traditional role of a lead guitar beautifully. Oluo truly got his chance to stand out on this track, with his soulful trumpet vibrato and trilling skills displayed front and center. As Lewis kept time, I was stunned at how well he managed to blur the line between human and machine. Rawlings coaxed spacey noises out of his keyboard, using only minimal effects. During this song, I kept thinking that we should send these four musicians into space to meet the aliens, as a representation of the great potential of the human race.

To follow this, they began a tune with a snapping intro from Flory-Barnes and some a capella work. As the whole band came into the mix, he and Lewis again displayed their ability to effortlessly lock into a tight groove. Flory-Barnes continued to impress with his pinch harmonics, and was visibly getting highly involved in the performance, looking almost possessed as he kept up with Lewis’s tempo. Lewis had the biggest smile on his face, you can tell that he takes an enormous amount of well-deserved pride in this project. Over this tight groove, Rawlings started to get extremely funky with the clavinet setting on his keyboard. The entire band was clearly ready to break free of their jazz mold and do something different. Lewis could be heard asking, “Where is Grace Love?!” To answer this question, she came onstage from the crowd. The rest of the band entered full-on funk mode, and she began to sing over them. The jazz audience at Nectar could not believe this was happening, and started to get a bit crazier. Her vocal lines interplayed perfectly with Oluo’s trumpet lines, carrying the melody and moving all of the fans to dance with extra vigor. As the jam slowed down and came towards its end, she embraced Oluo and left the stage.

At this point, the entire band had loosened up significantly since taking the stage. The next song featured an astounding series of full-band, syncopated stops that brought the focus back to the death-defying instrumental talent available onstage. The next track returned a bit to the space-funk territory, visited earlier in the show. Oluo’s trumpet playing absolutely stole the show here, as he went down to his knees to belt his expressive part out to the heavens. Flory-Barnes strutted around behind him, his bassline always keeping the listener guessing as to where it might go next.

The band stopped after this song, and appeared briefly to be finished with their set. The raucous reaction of the crowd quelled these notions, and the band members selected a final song to appease the audience. Flory-Barnes unleashed a barrage of notes that was seemingly endless, until it settled into a smooth quote of Radiohead’s “The National Anthem.” This quote continued, with spacey noise effects in the background from Rawlings, until Lewis and Oluo also joined into the cover. At this point, I was powerless but to scream at this unexpected cover of a personal favorite song. Lewis flawlessly reproduced Phil Selway’s chaotic cymbal work, while Oluo managed to nail the song’s horn part and Thom Yorke’s vocals simultaneously. Their version was complete with an improvised section in the middle, which was tied back into the song after a few minutes by Flory-Barnes’s subtle teasing of the bassline. Oluo eventually brought the song all the way back as he switched back to covering Yorke’s vocal part for a beautiful reprise of the main verse. This was the perfect cherry on top of their set, showing that these artists can handle anything from jazz standards to some of the most contemporary, jazz-inspired music out there. They are bringing groove-oriented jazz to the people in an accessible manner, and it makes me so happy to say that this is something you can only see regularly in Seattle. If you can, try to make it out to see their next show at the Seamonster Lounge on November 30, 2015.

Read the full article here.

Revelation of the Soul!

Revelation of the Soul!

By Dionne Poindexter on October 23rd, 2015
“We sit together waiting, making explorative chatter. 10, 20 minutes go by and then… Then it starts. This introduction of spoken word nuzzled with music and voice. It’s as if I’m being thrust into another realm… another world. The base, cool and collected and then an explosion of melody and chaos of the best kind. This erratic rhythm begins to take over my soul. The brass pushes at every sense inside my frame. The hand of Industrial Revelation is placed at my mouth, parting my lips and reaching down my throat, fisting my heart to pump the blood for me.  The beat of the skin builds and climbs and then… The strings. Silence. Then POW! So many notes. My body wants to move and shake, dance with this gift of the music. But I just met these people and it’s not that kind of venue so I quietly grove in my seat. The solitude of the keys, melancholy the way I like.  And just like that I am abandon. Left with the essence of what was.”
Read the full article here.

Liberation of Seattle Jazz Quartet, Industrial Revelation

Liberation of Seattle Jazz Quartet, Industrial Revelation

If you mix listening to more jazz with a little Just Blaze, some trumpets, and a few psychedelics here and there.
BY     OCTOBER 12, 2015

industrial revelation lede

Douglas Martin uses the Force to eradicate fruit flies

There’s a reason why we tell you to #listentomorejazz. It’s a genre that doesn’t care much for nostalgia; it takes you in the moment like no other genre of music, primarily because so much of it is being arranged with free pockets open to improvisation. Occasionally it takes you to far off lands based in far off times or makes you see the wonder and history of your backyard. Seattle jazz quartet Industrial Revelation does both of those latter feats simultaneously; referencing both the mysticism of the fallen civilization referenced in the album title and the rich jazz tradition of the group’s home base.

But this ain’t your daddy’s Kenny G downtown alleyway wine bar jazz, or even your grandfather’s dusty record collection with Bumps Blackwell’s name written in fine print on the sleeve. Liberation & the Kingdom of Nri features a cornucopia of styles, from spoken-word-styled hip-hop (“Introduction: Mighty Nation”) to reimagined spaghetti-westerns (“I Jam 4U, My Love”) and rollicking folk-pop (“FunGirl”). There’s classic R&B like “First Dance,” urgent blowouts like “Man from Obibi,” and songs like “No Way Out But In,” which, given the right vocalist, sounds like it was produced by Just Blaze (on a goodly amount of hallucinogenic drugs).

Lately, some of the more innovative names in modern jazz have taken the path toward afro-futurism, and though Industrial Revelation are more classical when judged on that metric, it doesn’t mean they can’t reach astral peaks. “Exit From the Morass” contains a spacey build to a soaring climax; D’Vonne Lewis’ rolling drum fills congeal into a solid groove before building to a thunderous climax and release. “Wait. No. Sound.” splits open a shuffling groove and what’s left is an outpour of bright drones, followed by a mournful trumpet solo by Ahamefule J. Oulo and soothing keys from Josh Rawling.

Oulo’s trumpet features a variety of musical languages, able to switch from mournful to wild and blustery within the span of a few short bars (like in “Voice Memo: Night Love”). On “Old Man Soul,” the trumpet is lovelorn. On the dramatic “HYPED!,” it screams a battle cry. It commands the lead when it needs to and adds just a touch of atmosphere when it doesn’t. The same statement could be said for all of the band’s players; they let the song dictate its own pace, but know when switch gears and courses. “Ellison Ellington” is a pencil shaving over a minute long, but it throws down both the sort of gospel vamp you only hear in church when people are catching the holy ghost and a grungy, psychedelic bounce.

So many different styles are represented in Liberation & the Kingdom of Nri, but the foundation of it all is firmly planted in jazz. You can tell in how the upright bass plucks feels as percussive as the drums, how the trumpet can go from cotton-sheet smooth to as coarse as the back of your throat when you’ve taken a shot at the cheapest whiskey the gas station can offer. Those styles come in service to Industrial Revelation’s fast-and-loose sense of virtuosity and this particular double-album’s breadth of sprawl. Exploration is an ambitious feat in any realm but especially music; thankfully the players in Industrial Revelation have more than enough talent, knowledge, and gusto to traverse a startling amount of territory and never get lost along the way.

Read the full article here.

Industrial Revelation Goes to New Orleans, Outer Space and a Medieval West African Kingdom

Industrial Revelation Goes to New Orleans, Outer Space and a Medieval West African Kingdom

‘Liberation and the Kingdom of Nri’ elevates the band’s lofty trajectory even higher.

Acid jazz lurches down the hallway of the Seamonster Lounge. The band—a Bellingham outfit called Celestial Navigation—plays in the far corner of the club, and its sound is like a rhino smashing through a series of Pollock paintings. A few minutes pass and D’Vonne Lewis, drummer and founder of Seattle avant-jazz band Industrial Revelation, pops through the front door.

Lewis’ unique speaking voice sticks in the mind after hearing only a few words. It’s kind, imbued with wisdom, and playful. He sits with a beer and we start to talk about his group, now in its 10th year, and its new record, a 20-track double album called Liberation and the Kingdom of Nri.

“There’s some cuts on there, man,” he says. No doubt. Industrial Revelation features four of the city’s most accomplished and adept musicians. Along with Lewis, who comes from a family of Seattle jazz players, there’s double bassist Evan Flory-Barnes, keyboardist Josh Rawlings, and trumpeter Ahamefule J. Oluo. Among them, they’ve played with Macklemore, Allen Stone, Hey Marseilles, Meklit Hadero, and countless others from varying musical worlds—rock to rap to classical. In fact, Oluo recently released a punk-rock record under the name The Honorable Chief, and it was his family’s Nigerian heritage that influenced the title of the new IR project.

Historically, the Kingdom of Nri is known as a peaceful, medieval West African state whose leader used no military force over his people. “They were just about acceptance and love,” Lewis explains. “We liked this idea, especially paired with the idea of liberation, which is also the name of a song I wrote for the record.”

“Liberation” is an epic, all-out New Orleans carnival. Its uproarious feeling is complimented by tracks like “I Jam 4U, My Love,” a slower build with an equal sense of height and breadth.

To release the new album, IR worked with Sam Anderson of Hey Marseilles and Pearl Jam guitar tech Josh Evans, both of whom helped during the mixing process. The recordings took place in several locations around Washington, including the famed Robert Lang Studio with engineer Homero Gonzalez. Nri is a more polished production than their last album, Oak Head; it may in fact be the starting point of a new, elevated trajectory for the group, which has already received a great deal of local acclaim.

No matter what happens in terms of success, Lewis says the members of IR wish to remain loyal to their hometown, though traveling in support of the record and scheduling a November tour is on the forefront of their minds. “I love living in Seattle,” Lewis smiles. “We all have expressed that if Industrial takes off in some way—and we don’t know what ‘take off’ means, exactly—but we’re all here in Seattle and that’s good for the city.”

This sentiment makes sense: The band’s essence is soaked in loyalty. It’s their secret weapon as writers and entertainers—the quality you notice first when seeing them perform and the thing most acutely remembered when the gig is done. They’re brothers on- and offstage, pushing one another to get to that next place, one step higher in the musical climb, to find the most powerful phrase to make each other go, “WHOOAAHH!” —a perfectly timed cymbal crash, the deep pluck of an open bass string, a screeching melody from horn or keyboard.

The record’s first single, “Amelia,” is named after Amelia Bonow, a veteran service-industry worker and co-founder of the viral #ShoutYourAbortion movement with Oluo’s wife, writer Lindy West. It’s a fresh breeze of a track that turns celestial and space-aged in its break. The song maintains an underlying steadiness, though, with rock-solid, ’90s hip-hop bass from the track’s writer, Flory-Barnes.

“I debated whether to call the song ‘Service Industry Crush’ or ‘Amelia,’ ” he grins. “On the one hand, it’s describing that feeling when you go into a bar or cafe and you see someone special, and on the other hand there’s meeting Amelia and getting to know her.”

The song’s mood and title speaks to the group’s conscientious core and the relationships they’ve built with Seattle folks of all backgrounds. “Relationships over time get stronger, bonds grow,” explains Lewis. “We are always trying to keep that machine oiled. With the band, we’re all so busy day-to-day, but we make time to hang even if we can’t play or rehearse. I feel like we’ve done that more so the past few years—we know our strengths and weaknesses. We know what works.”

This intimate knowledge is what allows the four to effortlessly transition between genres of sound, to build a crashing crescendo from a lighthearted piano riff. To turn a lark into a thunderous 22-minute jam complete with staccato drum solos, lightning trumpet strikes, and quaking bass riffs that sonically recall laughter, solidarity, and surprise.

“We’re constantly putting out our best and still trying to get better and better,” Lewis admits. “It’s almost overwhelming the love we get. But we want to try and reciprocate that—somehow. To just try and keep it going as best we can.”

Industrial Revelation Album Release. Frye Art Museum, Free, All Ages. 7 p.m., Fri., Oct. 9.

Read the full article  here.

Best of Seattle: Arts & Culture Winners

Chosen by the Readers of the Seattle Weekly

Best Jazz Group
Industrial Revelation

“It’s not often you see a jazz group pack Neumos or rock a stage at Capitol Hill Block Party, but Industrial Revelation is not your average jazz band. Ahamefule J. Oluo’s trumpeting, Evan Flory-Barnes’ upright bass, D’Vonne Lewis’ drumming, and Josh Rawlings’ keys are certainly rooted in the jazz tradition (Lewis studied it in high school, the other three at Cornish with famed saxophonist Hadley Caliman), but they veer all over the place, taking inspiration from hip-hop, punk, funk, and indie rock.”

Runner-Up: Garfield High School Jazz Band

Full article and list of winners located here.

Capitol Hill Block Party revs up with coolest indie bands this side of Nirvana

Review of Industrial Revelation’s CD Release performance at Rhythm & Rye on April 10th

Written by Carol Banks Weber

If Bumbershoot’s the big musical, corporate deal in Seattle come Labor Day Weekend, then the Capitol Hill Block Party’s its grungier, edgier grassroots cousin. Ever since CHBP opened ticket sales last Thursday, word’s spreading fast and show’s are selling out even faster.

In the Northwest, the coolest music festival technically isn’t really a festival. It’s one massive, awesome block party featuring some of the edgiest, hottest bands everyone should be listening to.

The 19th annual block party takes place July 24-26 on East Pike Street and 12th Avenue just north of downtown Seattle proper, where all the action usually is. Gates open at different times, depending on the day, but it’s usually between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.

Billboard’s Natalie Weiner broke the news of the initial lineup back in March. She spoke with block party producer Jason Lajeunesse about the uniqueness of this alternative music festival. “I’m very pleased with the lineup we were able to put together this year,” he said. “In a time when large festivals are popping up all throughout the U.S., and booking many of the same bands from top to bottom, I’m proud of our diversity and quality of talent in 2015. I feel like this lineup is exemplary of the spirit of the neighborhood and the festival as a whole.”

Check out the alternative, indie bands, though, from the Northwest and beyond — 100 of ‘em. They kick everyone’s behind, and a lot of their shows are already selling out fast. Besides fly names, the bands also bring legit talent ranging from hip-hop (Flatbush ZOMBiES), dream-pop (Whitney Lyman), and the highly, outlandishly inappropriate (Thunderpussy), to industrial, revelatory jazz, smooth electronica (Danny Harley’s The Kite String Tangle), and the completely ambient-freakadelic-goth bizarre (Lesbian — they’re men btw).

Even in a music festival as fringe and fabulous as this one, there’s bound to be a few headliners. At the Capitol Hill Block Party, they include Father John Misty, Girlpool, Shabazz Palaces, BadBadNotGood, Toro y Moi, The Kills, Built to Spill, Jamie xx, and TV On The Radio.

Tickets to the Capitol Hill Block Party available HERE.

Industrial Revelation plays on the Vera Project Stage on Sunday, July 26th at 2pm!

Industrial Revelation Rhythm & Rye Performance Review

Review of Industrial Revelation’s CD Release performance at Rhythm & Rye on April 10th
Written by Dick Metcalf

04.10.15 - Rhythm and Rye poster web

The occasion was the release of their new CD (soon to be reviewed here in our review pages)… BUT, it wasn’t “just another” release… a truly historic one, especially for our favorite Olympia venue, Rhythm & Rye… because the four mind-walloping tunes on this CD were actually RECORDED here (that’s a first for our friend Andy Geertsen if I’m not mistaken).  The performances were (as always) top-flight & full of energy… check out the heavy-duty quartet action by clicking the link  Ahamefule J. Oluo’s ‘End of Courtesy‘… this is a LIVE capture, by the way… & they were at the TOP of their game, no doubt you’ll agree  Heck, even their WARMUP tune was fantastic, don’cha’ know?

The set got a slightly late start (around 10:30 or so), but they were right off with best feet forward as soon as they setup… The players in this award-winning group are D’Vonne Lewis on drums; Evan Flory-Barnes on bass; Ahamefule J. Oluo doing trumpet & Josh Rawlings on fender rhodes/piano… the space is just JAMMED (as it always is when these gents are here) with folks ready to dance & party on DOW-un; energy quotients are SOARING!  What’s notably different about this performance is that the players are TOTALLY together… setup & sound check only took a couple of minutes once everyone was there, and they just JUMPED right into the tunes.  As I’ve said before (& will again), Oly owes a lot to Mr. Geertsen for making sure we have quality acts like this visiting our burg!  I’m truly looking forward to writing the review of their new release, so check back often… I’ll post the link on FB as soon as it’s ready!

Read the original article here.