Tag Archives: Neumos

Green Monkey Records May 2016 Album of the Month

Green Monkey Records
May 2016 Album of the Month

By Tom Dyer

For our May AotM, I am super pleased to feature Industrial Revelation, with selections from their 2 CD set Liberation & the Kingdom of Nri. In this writer’s opine, these guys are the best band in Seattle. Nurmero Uno. They were my number 2 album for the year in 2015 behind The Sonics and that ain’t small potatoes, no sir. I’ve written about them a couple places before and will include that stuff below, but rest assured these gentlemen can get in a room and make it happen. I really love their recordings but they are a super live band and I tell you go see them. They will be playing at Rhythm and Rye here in Olytown this coming Friday, May 20 and you know I will be there.

Dec 26, 2015 – GMR – TD Top 10 Albums: The closest I’ve come to seeing these guys is finding a couple cases of their last CD “Oak Head” on the sidewalk and making sure they got back to them. I kept a copy (they said ok) and thought it was pretty cool. Have tried to go see them a couple times but since they got The Stranger Genius Award they pack out and I ain’t got in. Which brings us to this very fine album. I got it a few weeks ago and I still don’t completely know what I think of it. But I do know I really like it. These guys are considered jazzbos but I’m not even sure that quite describes it. There are definitely serious chops here but there is a prevailing sense of order that somehow seems different to me. At points it is rather grand – cinematic. It is not particularly avant garde or dissonant (which I tend to favor) though some of that intellect seems to inform this. At points it is super groovin’ like on Grace Love’s guest vocal on “First Dance.” Maybe this is just what jazz has become through the filter of thirty years of hip hop and popular music. I dig it.

Josh-Rawlings-Standing-On-Bench-at-Lofi-Performance

Posted to Facebook Jan 3, 2016. “I went out and saw Industrial Revelation (for the first time) last night at Nuemos. This is a great band, at the height of their powers. The ease and beauty of their interaction is a wonderful thing to behold. It is effortless and highly pleasurable. They are each gifted musicians who have been playing together for ten years and know each other well. They clearly enjoy each other’s company.

I put their new album, Liberation & the Kingdom of Nri, at #2 on my Top Ten of 2015. I had a tricky time defining what they do. If you look at their own description on their bandcamp site, it fits the tricky mold. Their ephemeral nature comes into focus seeing them live. Ahamefule on the trumpet is almost like a rhythm guitar player in a rock band. He holds the basic line for many tunes and shapes it thru tonal and dynamic variation and to a lesser degree melodic variation. This leaves a ton of space for Josh on Fender Rhodes, who is living the wah-wah life. On top of his Rhodes is a stack of guitar pedals that he manipulates by hand. It is rare that that you hear a straight Rhodes sound coming from the stage – rather is a constantly changing wash of melodic time and space. D’Vonne is not a traditional jazz drummer in the sense of carrying time on the ride cymbal, snare is king – at points he just rocks four on the floor. Like his compatriots, his chops are super and he can go from a straight groove to open air accenting without a thought. Evan has monster chops like the rest, but also brings a sense of pure joy to his playing that is simply uplifting. As I watched him play, I thought, at that moment, there was no place more beautiful to be than inside his rapture.

If you can see this band, do. The band I watched last night was as good as any band I have seen in my life and I’ve seen a lot of them. Magnificent!”

Read the entire article here.

Instant Composition

Instant Composition
Article by Jonathan Zwickle with City Arts

Industrial Revelation at Neumos

The Industrial Revelation that played Neumos last night wasn’t the Industrial Revelation that played the Triple Door in 2007 or the Industrial Revelation that played the Comet two years ago. Today’s Industrial Revelation is one of the most formidable musical forces in a city full of them. How many bands in town have even been together for that long? I can think of only a handful and none has such a singular voice as IR. They’ve developed the profound cohesion attainable only by a veteran group of collaborators. Their hard-swinging, big-feeling garage jazz is the most vital sound in Seattle right now.

Last night at Neumos they played for over an hour and the crowd—young dudes fist-pumping, young women wooing, two gray-bearded jazzbo elders, people who saw IR at Doe Bay last summer—they wanted more. Along the way the band veered from hip-hop-inflected funk to soft-focus balladry to Bitches Brew-esque fusion groove outre psuedo-classical grandeur. Their best songs leave behind genre altogether and rise into that lustrous cloud of composition and improvisation—that mode of supraliminal expression—that Charles Mingus described in the liner notes of Let My Children Hear Music:

Each jazz musician when he takes a horn in his hand—trumpet, bass, saxophone, drums—whatever instrument he plays—each soloist, that is, when he begins to ad lib on a given composition with a title and improvise a new creative melody, this man is taking the place of a composer. He is saying, “listen, I am going to give you a new complete idea with a new set of chord changes. I am going to give you a new melodic conception on a tune you are familiar with. I am a composer.” That’s what he is saying.

Instant composition. That’s heavy. That’s IR.

Aham Oluo practically stabbed the microphone with his trumpet. He split his time blowing full-force and backed away from the mic, giving room to the remaining trio, while Josh Rawlins’ Rhodes took lead. On bass, Evan Flory-Barnes played the night’s most heart-swelling solos, bowing a gorgeous interlude early into the set and fast-plucking lines of deep funk. D’Vonne Lewis—who I called “Seattle’s most talented drummer” back in ’07—delivered neck-snapping breakbeats, softly sizzling accompaniment and blistering rock n’ roll thunder. He was also the band’s frontman for the night, introducing the players a couple times throughout the set and gamely bantering with the audience.

When was the last time you saw a trumpet as a lead instrument at Neumos? After some early adjustments, the sound inside the venue was as warm and solid as I’ve ever heard it. What a pleasure to hear this music, as dynamic in tone and volume as anything performed on this stage, on such a massive sound system, perfectly tuned. The sound was enveloping: A couple times the dancing crowd verged on moshing, recalling the fullblown jazz-made mosh pit that opened during BadBadNotGood’s show late last year. (Speaking of, BBNG is the best thing going in jazz from the other coast. Let’s get them on tour with IR.)

By the end of the show Flory-Barnes had practically ripped open his button-down shirt. Oluo was on his knees, horn directed straight up at the microphone, blasting a mortal cry toward the heavens.

“It’s been a great 10 years!” Lewis told the crowd. “Through all our differences, arguments, beefs, whatever, whenever we get on stage we are one.”

Read the full article here.