Tag Archives: Seattle Jazz

Magma Fest: Specs One, Industrial Revelation, Dex Amora, Cabin Games, Guests, Rogue Pinay

3/23/14

Magma Fest: Specs One, Industrial Revelation, Dex Amora, Cabin Games, Guests, Rogue Pinay
Written by Brittnie Fuller, The Stranger Recommended

The following is an excerpt of the article:

For those seeking jazz (*opens the flood gates*), Seattle quartet Industrial Revelation’s well-executed compositions are supercharged yet smooth, effortlessly building something that spreads over you like a marshmallow pillow of highly refined jazz fusion.

Full Article Here.

How Industrial Revelation Got Me into Jazz—a Year Early

12/25/13

How Industrial Revelation Got Me into Jazz—a Year Early
Written by Emily Nokes, The Stranger

“Someone once told me that the year I turn 30 would be the year that I start buying jazz records. I was skeptical of this statement because (a) What? and (b) I am currently 29 and have been, for the most part, unintentionally distanced from jazz. Fast-forward to a few months ago.

The Royal Room was sold out, and even though we had tickets, it was standing-room-only. Barstools, tables, higher tables, benches—every single seat was taken by a party mix of people. Young hip-seeming kids, (very) old people dressed to the nines, exuberant funky-glasses-wearing adults, a person in a beret looking like the sort of person who wears a beret—they were all there! And they were all there to see the self-described garage-jazz quartet Industrial Revelation.

It was hard to know where to focus once IR were on the stage. The band—Evan Flory-Barnes on upright bass, Josh Rawlings on keyboard, D’Vonne Lewis on drums, and Ahamefule J. Oluo on trumpet—was spilling talent all over the place. The kind of talent that’s hard to describe without a cop-out string of positive adjectives (amazing!)—but it wasn’t just their individual chops that had the audience hooting, whistling, seat-dancing, or otherwise completely smitten. Each song was like a conversation with a group of really smart and funny people—everyone takes turns telling brilliant stories, but no one is talking over the others or blabbing too long because everyone is fully engaged. Sure, Rawlings can masterfully play two keyboards at once before jumping onto his stool and smashing out a piano solo, and Oluo plays trumpet like the charismatic lead singer of a rock band, but even the slower and more classic-jazz-sounding songs had a fresh energy I really wasn’t expecting. Later, I bought a few albums’ worth of their MP3s. It’s not exactly a record, but then again, I’m not 30 yet, either.”

Full Article Here.

Family Reviving The Sounds of Seattle Rocker Dave Lewis

12/3/13

Family Reviving The Sounds of Seattle Rocker Dave Lewis
Written by Paul de Barros, The Seattle Times

The following is an excerpt of the article:

“In the late ’50s and early ’60s, instrumental rock ’n’ roll bands shook, rattled and rolled their way through West Coast dance halls, with the “Northwest sound” of such bands as The Wailers (“Tall Cool One”) central to this vibrant, pre-Beatles scene.

An African-American musician who strongly influenced the blues-drenched music of these white rock groups — and who also popularized the whir of the Hammond B-3 organ in Seattle — was Dave Lewis. Though Lewis had several regional radio hits — “Little Green Thing,” “David’s Mood,” “J.A.J.” — he never broke out nationally and is largely unknown to younger generations.

Lewis’ son and grandson — Dave Lewis Jr. and jazz drummer D’Vonne Lewis — aim to change that. On Saturday, they are presenting The Dave Lewis Revue II, a tribute to the elder Lewis at Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute.”

Full Article Here.

Some of That Jazz (What I’m Most Looking Forward to This Season)

9/11/13

Some of That Jazz (What I’m Most Looking Forward to This Season)
Written by Charles Mudede, The Stranger

The following is an excerpt of the article:

“It can be argued without much effort that the coolest band in Seattle is Industrial Revelation, a quartet that has a jazz foundation but is not musically confined by jazz. But why may IR be the coolest band in town? For one, Evan Flory-Barnes is the band’s bassist; for two, Ahamefule J. Oluo is its trumpeter; for three, Josh Rawlings is its keyboardist; and for four, D’Vonne Lewis is its drummer. Those are the four solid reasons, but here is the big question: Why doesn’t Seattle know that IR is probably its best and most promising band? Is it something like Edgar Allan Poe’s “purloined letter”? Something that is so obvious that it is entirely missed? Hopefully, the time of the Industrial Revelation will happen sooner than later.”

Full article here.

(Industrial) Revelation at the Comet

1/26/13

(Industrial) Revelation at the Comet
Written by Jonathan Zwickle, City Arts

The following is an excerpt of the article:

“The problem is the word: jazz bears too much baggage, reeks of crusty antiquity, is easy to make fun of. The music Industrial Revelation played at the Comet Tavern last night had as much to do with jazz as did the music Radiohead played at Key Arena a few months back.

Industrial Revelation had more in common with post-rock, the climactic, cinematic music of bands like Tortoise and Explosions in the Sky and Sigur Ros.

Within the first five minutes of last night’s gig, bassist Evan Flory-Barnes ripped the fretboard off his upright. Yes: He was playing so damn hard he ripped his damn bass apart.

Josh Rawlings sat at a Fender Rhodes with a head-high rack of compressors behind him and wah-wah pedal beneath. He played the [Rhodes] like a guitar with a whammie-bar, making the ancient thing screech and belt and roar in analog ecstasy.

Aham Oluo was spare in his runs on the trumpet, often coloring the space around the melody rather than filling in lines. His horn was an instrument of pressurization; he blew with such force and volume you could almost feel the air shifting inside the club. Oluo lolled in sensual blue notes, mediating Rawlings’ gonzo organ spasms.

On drums, D’Vonne Lewis was impeccable and versatile, probably Seattle’s most undersung drummer of any genre.

The songs they played were beautiful, dramatic, psychedelic, funny, funky, swinging, punchy. So much breadth in a single tune; many were multi-movement pieces of six or eight minutes that would sojourn in unexpected interludes before returning triumphant to a principal theme. They had names like “No Tears for a Wolf” (an Oluo original) and “Shadowboxing in the Wind” (by Lewis). By the end of the set, Oluo was in his undershirt and the other guys were sweating through their sweater vests.

All night the Comet was the Comet—beer-stained, noisy, dim, brick and broken-down. There were regulars at the bar, hippies and hipsters and grandpas in the audience. It was perfect. The old music sprung from places like this, not from supper clubs or concert halls. Putting Industrial Revelation there on a Friday night was the best thing Seattle could do for jazz.”

Full article here.

Seattle’s Most Outstanding Musical Artists of the Year

12/23/13

Seattle’s Most Outstanding Musical Artists of the Year
Written by Mark Baumgarten, Seattle Weekly

The following is an excerpt of the article:

“Anchored by the deft drumming of Seattle rock ’n’ roll royalty D’Vonne Lewis (his father was R&B legend Dave Lewis), garage-jazz band Industrial Revelation revels in lengthy and often slashing jazz deconstructions from organist Josh Rawlings, stand-up bass player Evan Flory Barnes, and trumpet player Ahamefule J. Oluo. But what put the band over the top this year was Oak Head, its third album and one that bravely challenges the group’s strengths. The band plays conservative with its talents here while dipping into numerous styles including modal jazz, funk, and Dixieland, but in that restraint is a sense of cool befitting one of the great jazz combos in the history of this city, which is exactly what IR is.”

Full Article Here.